Skip supplemental navigation

AU Section 380

Communication With Audit Committees

[Superseded by Auditing Standard No. 16, Communications with Audit Committees, effective for audits of fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2012. See PCAOB Release No. 2012-004.]

Source: SAS No. 61; SAS No. 89; SAS No. 90.
See section 9380 for interpretations of this section.
Effective for audits of financial statements for periods beginning on or after January 1, 1989, unless otherwise indicated.

.01

This section establishes a requirement for the auditor to determine that certain matters related to the conduct of an audit are communicated to those who have responsibility for oversight of the financial reporting process. fn 1 For purposes of this document, the recipient of the communications is referred to as the audit committee. The communications required by this section are applicable to (1) entities that either have an audit committee or that have otherwise formally designated oversight of the financial reporting process to a group equivalent to an audit committee (such as a finance committee or budget committee) and (2) all Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) engagements. fn 2

.02

This section requires the auditor to ensure that the audit committee receives additional information regarding the scope and results of the audit that may assist the audit committee in overseeing the financial reporting and disclosure process for which management is responsible. This section does not require communications with management; however, it does not preclude communications with management or other individuals within the entity who may, in the auditor's judgment, benefit from the communications.

.03

The communications may be oral or written. If information is communicated orally, the auditor should document the communication by appropriate memoranda or notations in the working papers. fn 3 When the auditor communicates in writing, the report should indicate that it is intended solely for the information and use of the audit committee or the board of directors and, if appropriate, management, and is not intended to be and should not be used by anyone other than these specified parties.

.04

The communications specified by this section are incidental to the audit. Accordingly, they are not required to occur before the issuance of the auditor's report on the entity's financial statements so long as the communications occur on a timely basis. There may be occasions, however, when discussion of certain of the matters (specified by paragraphs .06 through .14 below) with the audit committee prior to the issuance of the report may, in the auditor's judgment, be desirable.

.05

It may be appropriate for management to communicate to the audit committee certain of the matters specified in this section. In such circumstances, the auditor should be satisfied that such communications have, in fact, occurred. Generally, it is not necessary to repeat the communication of recurring matters each year. Periodically, however, the auditor should consider whether, because of changes in the audit committee or simply because of the passage of time, it is appropriate and timely to report such matters. Finally, this section is not intended to restrict the communication of other matters.

Matters to Be Communicated

The Auditor's Responsibility Under Generally Accepted Auditing Standards

.06

An audit performed in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards may address many matters of interest to an audit committee. For example, an audit committee is usually interested in internal control and in whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. In order for the audit committee to understand the nature of the assurance provided by an audit, the auditor should communicate the level of responsibility assumed for these matters under generally accepted auditing standards. It is also important for the audit committee to understand that an audit conducted in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards is designed to obtain reasonable, rather than absolute, assurance about the financial statements.

Significant Accounting Policies

.07

The auditor should determine that the audit committee is informed about the initial selection of and changes in significant accounting policies or their application. The auditor should also determine that the audit committee is informed about the methods used to account for significant unusual transactions and the effect of significant accounting policies in controversial or emerging areas for which there is a lack of authoritative guidance or consensus. For example, significant accounting issues may exist in areas such as revenue recognition, off-balance-sheet financing, and accounting for equity investments.

Management Judgments and Accounting Estimates

.08

Accounting estimates are an integral part of the financial statements prepared by management and are based upon management's current judgments. Those judgments are normally based on knowledge and experience about past and current events and assumptions about future events. Certain accounting estimates are particularly sensitive because of their significance to the financial statements and because of the possibility that future events affecting them may differ markedly from management's current judgments. The auditor should determine that the audit committee is informed about the process used by management in formulating particularly sensitive accounting estimates and about the basis for the auditor's conclusions regarding the reasonableness of those estimates.

Audit Adjustments

.09

The auditor should inform the audit committee about adjustments arising from the audit that could, in his judgment, either individually or in the aggregate, have a significant effect on the entity's financial reporting process. For purposes of this section, an audit adjustment, whether or not recorded by the entity, is a proposed correction of the financial statements that, in the auditor's judgment, may not have been detected except through the auditing procedures performed. Matters underlying adjustments proposed by the auditor but not recorded by the entity could potentially cause future financial statements to be materially misstated, even though the auditor has concluded that the adjustments are not material to the current financial statements. [As amended, effective for audits of financial statements for periods beginning on or after December 15, 1999, by Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89.]

.10

The auditor also should inform the audit committee fn 4 about uncorrected misstatements aggregated by the auditor during the current engagement and pertaining to the latest period presented that were determined by management to be immaterial, both individually and in the aggregate, to the financial statements taken as a whole. fn 5 [Paragraph added, effective for audits of financial statements for periods beginning on or after December 15, 1999, by Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89.]

Auditor's Judgments About the Quality of the Entity's Accounting Principles

.11

In connection with each SEC engagement (see paragraph .01), the auditor should discuss with the audit committee the auditor's judgments about the quality, not just the acceptability, of the entity's accounting principles as applied in its financial reporting. Since the primary responsibility for establishing an entity's accounting principles rests with management, the discussion generally would include management as an active participant. The discussion should be open and frank and generally should include such matters as the consistency of the entity's accounting policies and their application, and the clarity and completeness of the entity's financial statements, which include related disclosures. The discussion should also include items that have a significant impact on the representational faithfulness, verifiability, and neutrality of the accounting information included in the financial statements. fn 6 Examples of items that may have such an impact are the following:

  • Selection of new or changes to accounting policies
  • Estimates, judgments, and uncertainties
  • Unusual transactions
  • Accounting policies relating to significant financial statement items, including the timing of transactions and the period in which they are recorded

Objective criteria have not been developed to aid in the consistent evaluation of the quality of an entity's accounting principles as applied in its financial statements. The discussion should be tailored to the entity's specific circumstances, including accounting applications and practices not explicitly addressed in the accounting literature, for example, those that may be unique to an industry. [Paragraph added, effective for audits of financial statements for periods ending on or after December 15, 2000, by Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90.]

Other Information in Documents Containing Audited Financial Statements

.12

The audit committee often considers information prepared by management that accompanies the entity's financial statements. An example of information of this nature would be the "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" that certain entities that file reports with the SEC are required to present in annual reports to shareholders. Section 550, Other Information in Documents Containing Audited Financial Statements, establishes the auditor's responsibility for such information. fn 7 The auditor should discuss with the audit committee his responsibility for other information in documents containing audited financial statements, any procedures performed, and the results. [Paragraph renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89, December 1999. Paragraph subsequently renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90, December 1999.]

Disagreements With Management

.13

Disagreements with management may occasionally arise over the application of accounting principles to the entity's specific transactions and events and the basis for management's judgments about accounting estimates. Disagreements may also arise regarding the scope of the audit, disclosures to be included in the entity's financial statements, and the wording of the auditor's report. The auditor should discuss with the audit committee any disagreements with management, fn 8 whether or not satisfactorily resolved, about matters that individually or in the aggregate could be significant to the entity's financial statements or the auditor's report. For purposes of this section, disagreements do not include differences of opinion based on incomplete facts or preliminary information that are later resolved. [Paragraph renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89, December 1999. Paragraph subsequently renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90, December 1999.]

Consultation With Other Accountants

.14

In some cases, management may decide to consult with other accountants about auditing and accounting matters. When the auditor is aware that such consultation has occurred, he should discuss with the audit committee his views about significant matters that were the subject of such consultation. fn 9 [Paragraph renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89, December 1999. Paragraph subsequently renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90, December 1999.]

Major Issues Discussed With Management Prior to Retention

.15

The auditor should discuss with the audit committee any major issues that were discussed with management in connection with the initial or recurring retention of the auditor including, among other matters, any discussions regarding the application of accounting principles and auditing standards. [Paragraph renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89, December 1999. Paragraph subsequently renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90, December 1999.]

Difficulties Encountered in Performing the Audit

.16

The auditor should inform the audit committee of any serious difficulties he encountered in dealing with management related to the performance of the audit. This may include, among other things, unreasonable delays by management in permitting the commencement of the audit or in providing needed information, and whether the timetable set by management was unreasonable under the circumstances. Other matters that the auditor may encounter include the unavailability of client personnel and the failure of client personnel to complete client-prepared schedules on a timely basis. If the auditor considers these matters significant, he should inform the audit committee. [Paragraph renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89, December 1999. Paragraph subsequently renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90, December 1999.]

Effective Date

.17

This section is effective for audits of financial statements for periods beginning on or after January 1, 1989. Early application of the provisions of this section is permissible.

Footnotes (AU Section 380 — Communication With Audit Committees):

fn 1 Communication with the audit committee by the independent auditor on certain specified matters when they arise in the conduct of an audit is required by other standards, including—

  • Section 325, Communication about Control Deficiencies in an Audit of Financial Statements
  • Section 316, Consideration of Fraud in a Financial Statement Audit.
  • Section 317, Illegal Acts by Clients.
  • Section 801, Compliance Auditing Considerations in Audits of Governmental Entities and Recipients of Governmental Financial Assistance. In addition, section 722, Interim Financial Information, requires that certain information be communicated to audit committees as a result of performing a review of interim financial information. [Footnote revised, November 2002, to reflect conforming changes necessary due to the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 100.]
The following bullet is effective for audits of fiscal years ending on or after November 15, 2007. See PCAOB Release 2007-005A. For audits of fiscal years ending before November 15, 2007, click here.]
 

fn 2 For purposes of this section, an SEC engagement is defined as one that involves the audit of the financial statements of—

  1. An issuer making an initial filing, including amendments, under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
  2. A registrant that files periodic reports with the SEC under the Investment Company Act of 1940 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (except a broker or dealer registered only because of section 15(a) of the 1934 Act).
  3. A bank or other lending institution that files periodic reports with the Comptroller of the Currency, the Federal Reserve System, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, or the Federal Home Loan Bank Board because the powers, functions, and duties of the SEC to enforce its periodic reporting provisions are vested, pursuant to section 12(i) of the 1934 Act, in those agencies. (Section 12(g) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 provides an exemption from periodic reporting to the SEC to [1] entities with less than $5 million in total assets on the last day of each of the entity's three most recent fiscal years and fewer than 500 shareholders and [2] entities with fewer than 300 shareholders. Accordingly, such entities are not encompassed within the scope of this definition.)
  4. A company whose financial statements appear in the annual report or proxy statement of any investment fund because it is a sponsor or manager of such a fund, but which is not itself a registrant required to file periodic reports under the 1940 Act or section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

fn 3 The auditor may wish to review the minutes, if any, prepared by the audit committee for consistency with the auditor's understanding of the communications. [Footnote added, effective for audits of financial statements for periods ending on or after December 15, 2000, by Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90.]

fn 4 The presentation to the audit committee should be similar to the summary of uncorrected misstatements included in or attached to the management representation letter. See footnote 6 of section 333, Management Representations. [Footnote added, effective for audits of financial statements for periods beginning on or after December 15, 1999, by Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89.]

[The following footnote is effective for audits of fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2010. See PCAOB Release No. 2010-004. For audits of fiscal years beginning before December 15, 2010, click here.]

fn 5 The communication to management and the audit committee of immaterial misstatements aggregated by the auditor does not constitute a communication pursuant to section 317.17, Section 10A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or AU secs. 316.79-.82. The auditor may have additional communication responsibilities pursuant to section 317, Section 10A of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, or section 316.

fn 6 These characteristics of accounting information are discussed in the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Statement of Financial Accounting Concepts No. 2, Qualitative Characteristics of Accounting Information. FASB Concepts Statement No. 2 notes that consistently understating results or overly optimistic estimates of realization are inconsistent with these characteristics. [Footnote added, effective for audits of financial statements for periods ending on or after December 15, 2000, by Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90.]

fn 7 Guidance on the auditor's consideration of other information is also provided by section 558, Required Supplementary Information; section 551, Reporting on Information Accompanying the Basic Financial Statements in Auditor-Submitted Documents; and section 711, Filings Under Federal Securities Statutes. [Footnote renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89, December 1999. Footnote subsequently renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90, December 1999.]

fn 8 The glossary to Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) Statement No. 57, Related Party Disclosures [AC section R36], defines management as follows: Persons who are responsible for achieving the objectives of the enterprise and who have the authority to establish policies and make decisions by which those objectives are to be pursued. Management normally includes members of the board of directors, the chief executive officer, chief operating officer, vice presidents in charge of principal business functions (such as sales, administration, or finance), and other persons who perform similar policy-making functions. Persons without formal titles also may be members of management. [Footnote renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89, December 1999. Footnote subsequently renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90, December 1999.]

fn 9 Circumstances in which the auditor should be informed of such consultations are described in section 625, Reports on the Application of Accounting Principles, paragraph .07. [Footnote renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 89, December 1999. Footnote subsequently renumbered by the issuance of Statement on Auditing Standards No. 90, December 1999.]

Copyright © 2001, 2003, 2004, American Institute of Certified Public Accountants, Inc.